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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are ABCs?
  2. Who should apply to ABCs?
  3. Which ABC should I apply to?
  4. How do I apply to an ABC?
  5. Should I include my resume, references, letters of support, or a cover letter?
  6. Are there deadlines for submitting applications?
  7. When will my specific ABC of interest be considered?
  8. Will I be contacted when my application is being reviewed?
  9. Who makes the appointments?
  10. Will only self-identified applicants be considered for appointments?
  11. Are members of ABCs paid?
  12. What does "/diem" (per diem) mean?
  13. Will Engage PEI share information about the number of applicants, or how many people from each gender and each region apply?

1. What are ABCs?

"ABC" is the short form used for Agencies, Boards, and Commissions. These are organizations established by the Government of PEI. There are three types of ABCs:

  • Advisory ABCs provide information to government that will assist in the development of policy or in the ongoing delivery of programs.
  • Operational ABCs provide goods and/or services to implement approved government policy and programs.
  • Regulatory ABCs control public or private sector operations, review licenses, or hear appeals regarding government and third-party decisions.

The Government of PEI has almost 70 agencies, boards and commissions which include members of the public.

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2. Who should apply to ABCs?

The Government of PEI is looking for knowledgeable, hard-working Islanders to serve as members of ABCs. Being a member of an ABC is a great opportunity to contribute to our Island community. It is also an important way to represent the public's interests to the government. These are volunteer positions, but specific expenses are covered. Several ABCs also offer an honorarium to members.

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3. Which ABC should I apply to?

The descriptions of each ABC can be found here. Look at the profiles of the ABCs that sound most interesting to you. Think about whether your knowledge, skills and interests fit with the membership criteria. Also think about whether you will be able to meet the anticipated time commitments.

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4. How do I apply to an ABC?

There are two options. You can mail or fax an application by printing the paper application form. Send it to the address at the top of the form. Or, you can apply using the online application form .

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5. Should I include my resume, references, letters of support, or a cover letter?

Yes. A cover letter and/or resume would be especially useful. Your application should show that you are interested in being a member of an ABC. Your application should also list your skills or qualifications that are related to the position.

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6. Are there deadlines for submitting applications?

For the general call for applications, there is no deadline. We will add applications to the database as soon as we receive them.

If you are interested in a specific ABC, your application must be received two months before the vacancy. This will make sure it can be considered for the position. You can see when vacancies will be by looking at the ABC's profile.

Sometimes we will make calls for applications for specific ABCs with upcoming vacancies. For these calls for applications, we will include a deadline on the advertisement.

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7. When will my specific ABC of interest be considered?

Appointments to ABCs are ongoing. We try to fill ABC vacancies as quickly as possible. You can see the schedule of vacancies for each ABC on its profile page.

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8. Will I be contacted when my application is being reviewed?

We will contact you to confirm that we received your application. After this confirmation, we can only contact people being recommended for an appointment, so they can accept or decline the appointment. This is because there are a lot of people who apply to ABCs.

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9. Who makes the appointments?

The Lieutenant Governor-in-Council (also called the Executive Council or the Cabinet) makes all appointments. Several people are consulted to give recommendations before appointments are made. Usually, stakeholders, department officials, and the Executive Council are consulted to make recommendations.

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10. Will only self-identified applicants be considered for appointments?

Our long-term goal is that only self-identified applicants will be considered for appointments. This means that only people who apply online, by mail, by email, or by fax, could become members of ABCs.

Sometimes there are not enough people who apply for a position, or the people applying do not represent the diversity of PEI. If there are not enough people applying, Engage PEI might ask stakeholders for ideas to encourage more people to apply. Sometimes, people with particular skills needed by an ABC might be asked to apply. We want to ensure ABCs work as effectively as possible.

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11. Are members of ABCs paid?

All ABC members are volunteers. Most ABCs cover certain expenses, such as travel to meetings. Some ABCs also offer an honorarium to members. An honorarium is a payment for your service and time as part of the ABC. The Treasury Board Guidelines set out five categories of ABCs for honoraria:

Category A-1: ABCs where the chairperson receives either an annual salary or stipend as approved by Executive Council. There are often significant expenses for the chairs of these ABCs (travel costs, communications, and research) and this is accounted for in each ABC's budget.
Normally, the chair receives $200/diem and members receive $142/diem.
Category A:
ABCs requiring a high level of responsibility and decision-making authority.
Regulatory: The ABC is required to adjudicate, judge, or arbitrate.
Operational: The ABC provides direct operational/managerial functions for a specified entity.
Normally, the chair receives $200/diem and members receive $142/diem.
Category B: ABCs requiring a moderate level of responsibility and decision-making authority. ABCs are intended to assist the Ministers in the administration of the respective Acts.
Regulatory: The ABC has appeal and/or licensing function.
Operational: The ABC provides general supervisory role or performs a combination of advisory and moderate operation duties.
Normally, the chair receives $161/diem and members receive $109/diem.
Category C: ABCs with a lower level of direct decision-making authority. The ABC performs an advisory function to Ministers.
Normally, the chair receives $113/diem and members receive $73/diem.
Category D: ABCs for which members receive no remuneration from the Province.

Note: Civil Servants are not eligible to receive honoraria payments.

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12. What does "/diem" (per diem) mean?

“Per diem”, sometimes written as “/diem”, is the rate of compensation paid to a person attending a meeting as a member of an ABC. A member of an ABC can only be paid one “per diem” per board, per day, regardless of the length of the meeting or the number of meetings they attend in one day.

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13. Will Engage PEI share information about the number of applicants, or how many people from each gender and each region apply?

Yes. We think it is important to share this information. The number of people applying, including information about the gender and regions of these people, will be updated periodically.

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