Fonds Acc3607 - Chappell & Hunter, Architects fonds

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Chappell & Hunter, Architects fonds

General material designation

  • Architectural drawing

Parallel title

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Title statements of responsibility

Title notes

  • Source of title proper: Title based on provenance of the fonds

Level of description

Fonds

Reference code

CA PCA Acc3607

Edition area

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Class of material specific details area

Statement of scale (cartographic)

Statement of projection (cartographic)

Statement of coordinates (cartographic)

Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1888-1942 (Creation)
    Creator
    Chappell & Hunter, Architects

Physical description area

Physical description

ca. 1200 architectural drawings

Publisher's series area

Title proper of publisher's series

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Numbering within publisher's series

Note on publisher's series

Archival description area

Name of creator

Chappell & Hunter, Architects

Biographical history

The Charlottetown architectural firm of Chappell and Hunter was composed of architects Charles Benjamin Chappell and John Hunter Marshall. For some years in the 1920s and 30s the firm operated out of the Hughes Building on Queen Street.

Charles Benjamin Chappell was born in Charlottetown on10 October 1857, the son of William Chappell and Mary Ann Turner. On 25 September 1878 Chappell married Louisa Jane Holman ith whom he had two sons, Ernest C. and Frederick John and two daughters, Carrie and Ethel. Although listed as a carpenter in the 1881 census, in just a few years he was a partner in the firm of Phillips and Chappell and receiving commissions for work in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. His earliest works were the Charlottetown City Hall in 1887 and many of the buildings on Richmond Street which had been destroyed by fire in 1884. He also designed the Herald Building in Halifax and, for a time maintained an office in Sydney, Nova Scotia.

John Marshall Hunter was born in Lennoxtown, Lanarkshire, Scotland in 1881. He was married to Mary J. Taylor with whom he had at least one son, Joseph T. Hunter. After serving an apprenticeship as an architect with a Glasgow firm, he subsequently accepted an offer from the Canadian Pacific Railway. Later, as a member of a firm of Montreal architects specializing in church and home architecture, one of his first assignments was St. Dunstan's Basilica in Charlottetown to replace the church which had recently been destroyed by fire in 1913. Following the five year project, Hunter elected to remain in Charlottetown and went into partnership with Charles B. Chappell.

Together the two architects carried out many significant church and hospital architectural projects both in PEI and the mainland as well as designing and building residential, commercial and public buildings on the Island. These projects included the Rena MacLean Veterans hospital erected on the grounds of Government House, the new Charlottetown Hospital, Antigonish Hospital, an addition to St. Dunstan's University, and renovations to the Court House in Charlottetown, Falconwood Hospital, and the Prince County Hospital. In addition, during the later years of his career, Chappell designed Heartz Memorial Hall, Zion Presbyterian Church, the Baptist Church in Wolfville, Nova Scotia and the Presbyterian Church in Amherst, Nova Scotia.

Charles Benjamin Chappell died in 1931 followed only a few years later by John Hunter Marshall in 1942.

Name of creator

Chappell, Charles Benjamin

Biographical history

Charles Benjamin Chappell was born in Charlottetown on 10 October 1857, the son of William Chappell and Mary Ann Turner. On 25 September 1878 Chappell married Louisa Jane Holman with whom he had two sons, Ernest C. and Frederick John and two daughters, Carrie and Ethel.

Although listed as a carpenter in the 1881 census, in just a few years he was a partner in the firm of Phillips and Chappell and receiving commissions for work in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. His earliest works were the Charlottetown City Hall in 1887 and many of the buildings on Richmond Street which had been destroyed by fire in 1884. He also designed the Herald Building in Halifax and, for a time maintained an office in Sydney, Nova Scotia.

In 1918 or 1919 he took on as partner, John Hunter Marshall, an architect with a Montreal firm which had built the new St. Dunstan's Basilica. The new firm, known as Chappell & Hunter, Architects operated out of the Hughes Building on Queen Street.

Together the two architects, carried out many significant church and hospital architectural projects both in PEI and the mainland as well as designing and building residential, commercial and public buildings on the Island. These projects included the Rena MacLean Veterans hospital erected on the grounds of Government House, the new Charlottetown Hospital, Antigonish Hospital, an addition to St. Dunstan's University, and renovations to the Court House in Charlottetown, Falconwood Hospital, and the Prince County Hospital.

In addition, during the later years of his career, Chappell designed Heartz Memorial Hall, Zion Presbyterian Church, the Baptist Church in Wolfville, Nova Scotia and the Presbyterian Church in Amherst, Nova Scotia.

Charles Benjamin Chappell died in 1931.

Name of creator

Hunter, John Marshall

Biographical history

John Marshall Hunter was born in Lennoxtown, Lanarkshire, Scotland in 1881. He was married to Mary J. Taylor with whom he had at least one son, Joseph T. Hunter. After serving an apprenticeship as an architect with a Glasgow firm, he subsequently accepted an offer from the Canadian Pacific Railway. Later, as a member of a firm of Montreal architects specializing in church and home architecture, one of his first assignments was St. Dunstan's Basilica in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, to replace the church which had recently been destroyed by fire in 1913. Following the five year project, Hunter elected to remain in Charlottetown and went into partnership with Charles B. Chappell.

The firm known as Chappell & Hunter, Architects, operated out of the Hughes Building on Queen Street. Together the two architects carried out many significant church and hospital architectural projects both in PEI and the mainland as well as designing and building residential, commercial and public buildings on the Island. These projects included the Rena MacLean Veterans hospital erected on the grounds of Government House, the new Charlottetown Hospital, Antigonish Hospital, an addition to St. Dunstan's University, and renovations to the Court House in Charlottetown, Falconwood Hospital, and the Prince County Hospital.

John Marshall Hunter died in 1942.

Custodial history

Scope and content

The fonds consists of elevations, floor plans, cross sections, and detail drawings and blueprints for projects carried out by Chappell and Hunter. Approximately two-thirds of the blueprints duplicate original drawings but the remainder are unique to the project. Project files have been intellectually arranged in five series by structure classification as follows:

Series 1: Residential
Series 2: Commercial
Series 3: Churches and parochial residences
Series 4: Public buildings
Series 5: Miscellaneous unidentified

Notes area

Arrangement

Language of material

  • English

Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

NO RESTRICTIONS ON ACCESS

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

PERMISSION FOR USE AND REPRODUCTION IS REQUIRED FROM THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES AND RECORDS OFFICE; QUESTIONS REGARDING COPYRIGHT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE USER

Finding aids

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS AND PROJECT FILE LISTINGS ARE AVAILABLE

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General note

Drawings are located in Drawers 16-18 of the map cabinets

Alternative identifier(s)

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Standard number

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Description record identifier

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Language of description

  • English

Script of description

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